March-April 1972

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March -April 1972

I don’t seem to have photos for this period of time. I did discover from my notes that the film hadn’t been advancing– so no pictures, that I thought I had, for Christmas and into the spring apparently. I’m illustrating with just some general photos until I catch up. Reading this certainly explains why I’ve not been able to find slides for that period of time.

My writing may be tedious to some but the daily trivia seems to be what made up our lives during that time, rather than any dramatic happenings. Just generally life going on as life does. Readers may want to skim along until something sparks interest.

March 23rd
Doris brought over Linda’s lookout story for me to blend with mine. (Doris Ohde worked on several lookouts over the years and their children spent a lot of time living with her during the summers.)

Substituted for Mr. Horschel that morning–three math classes and one guitar class. One of the smaller math classes had several hoodish types who spoke constantly of stealing cars, bicycles. What they’d like to do to highway patrolmen, etc. “What a future they have to look forward to.” One boy, whom I taught in 2nd grade at Big Bar, seemed like a really nice kid. I hadn’t seen him since then until now. At noon I rushed home and hardboiled three eggs. I ate one and took the other two to the elementary school for Rebecca to decorate in her class. Turned out she’d already done two extras that they had so she brought them home. Then I went over to the courthouse where Bob was still in the PUC meting. Dick Vance (a phone company upper echelon person?) was speaking. Pat Hamilton and I were about the only non-official people there although she was there as a reporter. The meeting was over in about 15 minutes. Bob introduced me to the phone company’s public relations person.

Pat Hamilton and I headed for Varney’s, meeting Doris on the way. Pat and Doris had lunch while I had coffee and a doughnut. Dotty Murphy came in and sat with us for a few minutes. She said she and Rex had been in Mexico during the mating season of the iguanas and that the iguanas kept dropping out of the trees onto them. It was a good visit with all three friends.

I hurried home and met Rebecca who had been home a few minutes. We went to pick up the boys at Linda Lindsey’s. Jeff was still asleep and it took awhile to wake him. Went home and mowed the lawn, then jogged 13 laps in the backyard. (I figured each length of the backyard at 100 feet). Picked some forsythia and narcissus for a vase in our bedroom.

Bob ate at home that day. He was a lot more relaxed now that the PUC hearings were over with.

The next day I managed to get the “Ranger Rick” story typed. I used most of Linda Ohde’s version in place of part of mine (she wrote well and from her own viewpoint of living on a lookout). It was difficult getting it done though because of interruptions before time to get the children from Warm Mt. School.

Rebecca rode the bus to Nancy Van Duyn’s after school for Nancy’s birthday party. That morning Bob had taken Rebecca to the phone company to see the operators. She brought home one of their cards and a special pencil.

Bob was having tension headaches (I think he had migraines in his teens) and I was having headaches that Dr. Breeden thought were from tension in my neck, perhaps arthritis. No stress in our house!

A couple of days later we had Kent Adrian with us for the day—Florence and Leonard had brought him up from Sacramento for a visit—but she had to go to Redding to help Uncle Stanford pack. He was getting married in Reno in a week and wanted to sell his house.

Ruth Ryan came up to borrow our infant seat (Clarke was too big for it now) as Mildred Hurd had forgotten theirs for Brendan and she and the children were visiting them.

The day Kent was with us I picked up Ceci Hurd and we went to Varney’s and then to the park. Brought every one home, put Clarke down for a nap, and then Ceci and Rebecca started walking down to Ryan’s but Vernon picked them up.

Leonard called to ask whether we wanted the piano tuned and R. Cox came to do the tuning; and that ended my vacuuming for a while. Children came home and so it went.

Another day I drove a little way up the Weaver Bally Road to look for a piece of manzanita to use for an Easter egg tree. I found one and the children discovered a little creek about a foot wide and an inch to 3 inches deep. Clarke threw rocks in, Jeff and Rebecca sailed stick boats. Jeffrey didn’t quite make it across a few times. They had a good time. From there we went to Lowden Park where we ate lunch and the children played on the equipment. I met a woman there whose husband was interviewing for a job teaching handicapped children in Mad River. Now and then I’d follow Clarke up the slide and down before continuing our conversation. Back home I blew out three eggs and Rebecca and Jeff colored them with felt pens. We used those and one dyed at school and tied the eggs on the branch we’d brought home, using thread and tape, after putting the branch in a can covered with aluminum foil and filled with gravel. We put it on top of the piano.

The first of April Bob called to tell me Sandy Sanders had a massive heart attack at the phone company while visiting Gilda. Bob tried to revive him, and Roy helped with the CPR, but by the time Dr. Polka got there, in six minutes, he was gone. We were so fond of both Gilda and Sandy. He was only 52. Bob was in tears off and on all weekend. Bob worked Saturday. Sunday morning, after hunting eggs, we went out to the ranch. I’d gotten up early to hide eggs but Rebecca came in while I was putting on my jacket. I told her I was going out to see whether the bunny had come yet and hurried around outside. The bunny brought her a musical pink pig which she named Petunia; Jeffrey an orange and yellow crab which he named “Susy” after his crabby mother; and Clarke a seal. They wore boots with their pajamas while they hunted because of rain the night before.

It was beautiful out at the ranch and I thought it helped Bob a lot to be there. Many deer. The pear trees were in bloom and the wild mint about an inch high. Rebecca and Jeffrey waded a little in the spring across the road. We got back to town around 3:00. Bob went to work again. He was going to go to Eureka and catch a plane from there Monday–packed for that and left the house. Decided to go see Gilda and after that came home instead. He said he’d catch a ride with Lonnie Monday, which he did.

Monday night I picked up Patty Forero to babysit while I went to my class. Bev and Larry asked me to have a glass of wine, which I did, while the “poor kids” were waiting in the car.

The next day I took the children to Linda Lindsey’s and Kay was dropping Michael off at the same time. Went to Sandy’s funeral. The place was packed. I sat in the back row and promptly started weeping. This was only my second funeral and I felt as if what Sandy would have liked in his open coffin was “a bottle of Trinity Lake water, a picture of Gilda and a good stiff drink”. I left the back way, not going past the coffin. Went home, got myself together and then went to get the children.

Jeff came down with a severe earache and I had to go to Redding to meet Bob at the airport at 9 p.m. As Dr. Breeden said, Jeffrey didn’t handle fevers well. He would get tremors even when the fever wasn’t terribly high. I didn’t want to leave him with any of our regular sitters. Florence came up to the house to take care of the children while I drove to Redding. It was very windy and stormy in Redding, with lightning. The plane was on time but Bob said it had been very rough especially between Chico and Redding.

One thing Bob said on the way home was that he was being considered for a job in Bakersfield and we joked about the commuting costs. We got home around 11 p.m.

I noticed in the marriage listings in the Redding paper that both Uncle Stanford’s and his new wife’s ages were listed as “over 21”.

April 11th there was a school board meeting that I attended and Bob had an air pollution board meeting to go to so we got Lesley Callahan to watch the children. I rode to the board meeting with Bev Callahan.

Saturday Bob worked at the office half a day and then in his home office the other half. Sunday we went out to the ranch. It was a little chilly but we enjoyed the afternoon. “The apple trees all had big fat buds and some a few flowers. Had forgotten how good the apple blossoms smell. We ate dinner at Big Bar Station. Bob talked to Dick Farmer there and found that Fish & Game had planted fish in Little French Creek at the bridge last weekend. We’d seen tracks of their truck but hadn’t been able to figure out why a truck would go only as far as the bridge.”

Clarke got sick and had medicine that he had to take an hour before breakfast. He was so upset watching others eat and kept asking for “wa-wa” even picking up a plastic cup of Rebecca’s and holding it out. I relented and gave him a little water in it, which he gulped down. When it was ok for him to eat he drank most of the bottle before putting it down. Poor child was probably dehydrated from the previous day’s fever.

Although the children were watching t.v. when Bob left for Garberville again, Rebecca said, “You know, Mommy, I’m lonesome when Daddy is gone.”

I attended a teachers’ in-service training session at the high school. Nothing very interesting occurred. Lunch was good-at the Parish House and fixed by the Women’s Fellowship. The guest speaker was “ghastly” I wrote, from the California Teacher’s Association. After lunch there was some communication between the high school and elementary school. “I got frowned upon for speaking of Open House as a circus.” On a Friday I attended a workshop in Hayfork. “It was really boring except for one period of time during which small groups met where our group listed things which inhibited learning.” Our group had a good time with that. I met Mary Murray who had started a class for gifted children over there.

Bob showed me a clock circuit he made…apparently it would give him very accurate timing. The most expensive part was the quartz crystal which vibrated rather like a pendulum from current put into it.

One Saturday, when Bob was working on income tax, we all went over to Lowden Park for a brief picnic. He pushed the children on the merry-go-round, went on a swing and caught Clarke when I turned him loose at the top of the slide. Later we went to Trinity Center for a reception for Uncle Stanford and Coveeta. Everyone else seemed to be formally dressed but I wasn’t going to dress up too much when I had children to feed and spills to clean up.

Sunday we went to the ranch with the Ohdes, all except Eric. A fairly relaxed day and we ate at Big Bar on the way home. It had been a long time since we’d spent a whole day with them.

February-March 1972

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February 21st, a Friday, I went out to Warm Mt. School to get Jeff and no one was there. I was irked because we needed to leave for the Bay Area late that afternoon. Went out again later and met them on the road on my way home for a 2nd time.

Clarke stayed with Linda Lindsey. The rest of us ate dinner in Redding and got to Palo Alto around 11 p.m. Saturday morning we spent at Stanford University. Went to the bookstore where Bob got some books he needed and I bought books which Rebecca and Jeffrey chose.

We then headed for San Francisco and stopped at the International Airport, parked the car and rode the elevators and escalators (including the elevator with windows) up to the observation floor. We watched several planes land and take off, baggage being unloaded on conveyor belts; passengers going through the tunnel-like affairs into the planes, etc. One conveyor belt we rode on (Rebecca called it a flat escalator) was like a moving sidewalk—passengers could ride on it or walk if they wanted to go faster. We got a motel in S.F. and ate a greasy lunch in a little place across from the motel. Then we went to the opera house.

Swan Lake was a very lovely ballet. The dancing was good, the costumes bright, the sets well done—we really enjoyed it. At intermissions I’d take the children out and walk them up and down—Rebecca wanted to be more independent so she’d go back to be with Bob. She was very restless through the whole thing but seemed to be having a good time. There were marvelous clouds of mist during the lake scenes.

Afterwards we went back to the motel—then walked up to the Hippoburger Restaurant for dinner. What a contrast to the grace and beauty of the ballet!
Got helium balloons and the children were delighted to walk back with them–Rebecca clutching hers closely for safe keeping, Jeffrey letting his fly high above and behind.

Sunday we drove to Fishermen’s Wharf, left the car and caught the cablecar up to Chinatown. Lots of Chinese people on the streets and we saw some of the Chinese New Year decorations. Went in a Chinese store and bought some lechee nuts and Chinese candy; went into a tourist trap-type store and got plastic chopsticks for Rebecca and a flute for Jeffrey; Also went to the cablecar barn; rode the cable car back to Fishermen’s Wharf and zipped through for a quick look at Cost Plus; ate lunch and then started back for Weaverville.

A few days later, when talking to my dad on the phone, he said that when he was living in San Jose as a child, he’d take an electric bus to the ferry, take the ferry to S.F. and a cable car to his school. If the ferry was late he and a friend would run and catch up with the cable car.

Some very depressing notes on my mother’s physical condition and father’s future in trying to care for her. Lots of physical pain for her (and I’m sure emotional) and lots of emotional pain for him. No way I could go up there with all my obligations at home unless maybe in the summer.

Bought tickets for the Irish Rover at the Gold Pan.

Apparently the piano we were using belonged to Kay Morris but she hadn’t needed it while we had it. We kept looking at pianos and finally purchased one from the Lawrence Jordans in Douglas City. They lived in a big, old two-story house, the bottom story of logs, across Brown’s Creek. It was reached by turning off the highway just north of the rest area. The old highway used to follow that road and had a bridge across the creek about ¼ mile from the turnoff. Mrs. Jordan had emphysema and was in pretty bad shape. He was 75 and she was 72. “Very nice people, lonesome, as are so many older people. “ She showed me the house and some pillows she was making from towels and dishcloths, really rather nice pillows but tedious work. It was an upright piano, dark finish, good tone quality. He really didn’t like to see it go. He liked to look at the family pictures on it and liked to hear people play it sometimes who came to visit. They wanted $175 for it.

When we went home we watched a program about Nixon’s visit to China.

Friday the high school called at quarter to 8 and wanted me to sub for Mrs. Bartleston who had to take her one-month old baby to the hospital because his hands were turning blue. I told them I couldn’t make it until 9. The day passed without much strain. Bob Turnbull covered for the German II class first period. Then I had English Lit., World Lit., German I, lunch and German I. She had films scheduled for the German classes. Had lunch at Varney’s and then there was a prep period later so I could leave. Went out to Warm Mt. School with Jeanne Meyer where transportation was discussed. Mary Figerton and the Van Duzens would handle the transportation (Douglas City area?). Jeannie would take everybody both ways on Tuesday and Thursday. I’d drive Monday and Friday afternoons and Wednesday mornings. The Coverts would drive Monday and Friday mornings and Wednesday afternoons.

It was snowing by the time I got back to town and picked up the children. Washed the breakfast dishes, got dinner started, read the paper quickly and had a glass of wine. Fixed a salad and spaghetti. Bob got home about quarter to seven while I was bathing Clarke. It was nearly 9 by the time Rebecca and Jeffrey got to bed. Jeff spelled out on the refrigerator “Tiggr is a cat.” And had “we don’t hav iny” but didn’t finish. He was really making a lot of progress.

Rebecca was delighted about the piano. Clarke was scooting around the kitchen that evening in his pajamas with Jeffrey’s grey hat pulled down over his eyes. “He really looked cute.” Bob washed the dishes that night. Watched part of Chronology (not sure what that was) about children injured in Viet Nam. “very, very tragic.”

On the weekend Bob and Dick (and Tom Miller, Scott and Bill Harger) moved the piano from Jordan’s to our house and the other piano to Dick and Kay’s new house.

We invited Aunt Nell to come for dinner. I made an up-side-down cake and baked a ham. She seemed to have a pretty good time. Bob picked her up around 5:30 and she wanted to go home a little before 9. Clarke was very sweet with her.

March 1st we woke up to a couple of inches of snow before it turned to rain. I drove the children out to Warm Mt. School. No snow there. While I was talking to Janet and Mike, Clarke wiggled out of his car-seat and was half way to the barn before I grabbed him.

Bob went to Garberville again for a few days. Rebecca chose to not go to ballet again. On Thursday morning I took the boys to Linda’s and went to visit the elementary school. I’d planned to visit Mrs. Miller’s class but accidentally went into Ruth Brandes’ instead. It was a very interesting experience. She tolerated a much higher level of noise than I would have expected.

At music class I practiced reading music and then played by ear. Two women came in who wanted to listen. Then Jim Grigsby came in and we played a few tunes together. Then I went to the recorder class. We ended up laughing a lot, which made it kind of hard to blow. Friday night Bob and I went to a movie called Friends. It was excellent—beautiful photography and “a rather tender and amusing, story”. Bev and Larry Forero came in during the intermission. We left when the next show started and I suggested to Bob that we have some brew at the Brewery. We met Jim Fields in there and he introduced us to Tom Farmer, with whom he was having a discussion. Well, after a while Candy came in with Carin and we visited for a while, munching peanuts and drinking beer. Candy said that Jim had taught Carin the alphabet. The Fields left and we continued to talk until Darlene and Tom Farmer suggested everyone go to their place for tacos. I shook my head “no” and found Bob nodding and saying “o.k.” It was 11:30. So we went. We didn’t get home until 1:00. Christi was babysitting so he had to take her home.

The next day Bob and I dropped the children off at Linda’s and went out to the ranch. We ate a quick lunch at the gate where we found two pickups parked, one belonging to Dick Hamilton. The road was in pretty good shape. We were so relieved to find the bridge still there. We met Mary and Dick Hamilton near the bridge. They’d gone in to look at a logging machine—an old one on a flat above the creek. Dick wanted it. The water was very high—all white. We walked on up to the house and stayed there a while. I found frog eggs in the pond. A pretty day—buttercups in bloom, milkmaids, and gooseberries. Currents were about to bloom. The other pickup belonged to some men who worked for a logging company and they were going up to look at the Humboldt Fir property. We got home around 5:30.

Fed the children, then went to the Rotary Ladies’ Night dinner. Sat near Van Duyns, Senta Moore, the Bishops, etc. Had a pretty good time until the last half hour when the M.C. got raunchy. Sunday Bob put up the drapes in our bedroom and the living room.

I got a letter from the Ranger Rick staff wanting me to rewrite my article but definitely interested.

We filled in for each other on transportation to Warm Mt. School when there were sick kids. One day I took, in addition to my usual, Lauri Figeton to Steel Bridge Road and one Van Duzen child to their place.

Linda Lindsey and I were going to hike out to the ranch but I had to cancel because Clarke was sick and there was no one to leave him with.

Went to Redding with Ruth Bartz to hear the Irish Rovers. She offered to drive, which was a good thing because the clutch chain broke on the VW that day. It was such a treat to hear and see a group like that who seemed to be enjoying themselves as they played. There were five men and between them they played guitars, an accordion, a tin flute, a banjo, a goatskin drum, and of course all of them sang. There were about 30 people from Weaverville there. We went to Sambo’s for coffee and a sundae afterwards. Got home after midnight. Bob babysat.

I showed Jeffrey how to saw a board. I helped hold the board while he sawed. The expression on his face when the piece dropped off was really something! He was so pleased at the result after all his hard work.

Took the children to Dick and Kay’s beautiful new house for Michael’s birthday. It was rather chaotic—two years old is pretty young for a party. Scot Lindsey and Clarke managed to dump their grape juice all over everything. All but one were runny nosed. Jeffrey complained of an earache so we left first. Another night of being up a lot because he had so much pain in his ears. Had started him on antibiotics that afternoon. All three were not well.

Bob got back that evening, having been to Bakersfield and then Garberville. An employee and her husband had been killed in a car accident. She was their chief operator in Garberville. Then I started feeling sick. Bob went to Garberville again a couple of days later and by then I felt well enough to take the kids to the park. We needed sweaters though. Took a kite and flew it on the school grounds.

“I really feel like I’ve had it with child care for the last two weeks.” All the sickness and crankiness. And of course hadn’t been well myself. But I mentioned that tulips were in bloom and forsythia and daffodils.

“Rebecca was looking up words in the dictionary and asking me t spell them tonight. She wrote them all down (many new to me) to take to school.”

On March 22nd I wrote that “the children are all healthy again!” That Sunday Bob got up early and went out to do road work at the ranch. I went out with the children and took lunch. It was cold and foggy in the morning but then cleared off and was beautiful. I got a lot done there, the kids played, the plum and peach trees were in bloom. The frogs croaked just before we left. We ate dinner at Big Bar.

Monday Bob went to Garberville again so I had to get Christi Forero to babysit whileI went to music class. During the afternoon I left Jeff and Clarke with Linda Lindsey for naps. I went out to pick up Robin at Warm Mt. School and when I got back Rebecca had just gotten home. We went to pick up the boys but since they were both still asleep Linda said to leave them so Rebecca and I went to Varney’s and then to her piano lesson. On the way the clutch went out on the VW again. I remembered what Bob had said about turning off the engine to shift so was able to get her up to Mrs. Gott’s and the car to Miller’s Garage. Lonnie gave me a ride home. I went to get Rebecca with the truck. I had some trouble with the emergency brake on the truck Monday night when I picked up Christi. Larry Forero said the headlights on the truck were out on one side.

Tuesday morning I took Jeff and Clarke to McClurg’s and drove the truck over to get gas. The VW was fixed so I left the truck there to get the headlight fixed and went in the VW to get Linda and drive out to the ranch. The sun came out and we had a pleasant hour out there before clouding over. Rain began as we left. Linda seemed to enjoy her day away from kids.

February 1972

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The afternoon that I got back from hiking up Glennison Gap, Candy Fields came with Carin and left her with us while she went to a nurse’s meeting. Clarke tried to bug Carin by waving his hand near her face but Jeffrey took her under his wing.

Bob Gravette called and asked whether I would help in making a survey for Shasta College and I said I would.

Rebecca lost two teeth in one week—one while biting into a dill pickle and the other by biting a hard snowball.

My mother was in the hospital in Seattle again having surgery on her hip.

On Tuesday, the 25th, there was about five inches of snow on the ground. Bob Hooper picked up Rebecca to take her to school and Dennis Hooper came over around 10 to play with Jeff. I was going to take the truck out and get chains put on at a service station but decided to put chains on the VW myself because it was easier to travel with children in the VW than in the truck. It took me about ½ hour to get the chains on what with cold hands, feeding children lunch, and general struggle with the snow. I took Dennis to school and went to the post office.

Later Alice Jones came over with a tape from Peter for me to listen to with her–describing a meeting with some prominent conservationists including Brandenberg, who is the head of the Wilderness Society. Things got very political within the conservation organizations. Peter was doing some studies on the Redwood National Park area as well as other forest types. He was in Wisconsin looking over forest practices there.

After Alice left I got Clarke up and we went over to the elementary school for a conference with Rebecca’s teacher. We decided to start having Rebecca stay after school on Mondays to see whether she can get more accomplished on a one-to-one basis. “I really think most of Rebecca’s time there this year has been wasted. It’s not the teacher’s fault. She has some real rowdies in there.” I brought the Hooper’s kids up to our place so they could attend their conference.

Best buddies from way back.

The next day I took Jeffrey and Anne Marie out to Warm Mt. School. The door on the driver’s side of the car was frozen shut. Took off the chains by the Meyer’s place. The road from the Hayfork Highway out was slick with a skim of packed snow. I stayed awhile and played my accordion. Clarke was into everything including paint, which he got all over his hands and face. Jeff wanted to leave when I did so he came home. Rebecca went to public school that day because she had some things about Japan to share. It was snowing hard and we took the truck over to get chains put on.

I was supposed to go to Redding Friday for training for the Shasta College survey but needed to take the car, not the truck. I managed to get one chain on but not the other. George Halcomb came and plowed our driveway and I made it down to Oregon St. but couldn’t make it up the hill from there so I called and cancelled. The meeting down there started at 9:30. A couple of hours later I would have been fine. Discovered I’d done something dumb with the chains, twisted one and that’s why it wouldn’t go on. Put the other one on upside down—things like that seem to happen with hurrying and children. (these were real chains, not the cable things most use now) Bob called from Bakersfield and was to fly to SF that night, drive to Palo Alto and go to the library at Stanford and then come home.

Bob Hooper gave Rebecca a ride to school again. Sharon Kennedy, from Lewiston, was going to come to the house to show me how to do the survey on Monday.

I was working on an article for Ranger Rick Nature Magazine about how Linda Ohde lived on a lookout.

“Rebecca came home yesterday from school and told me there would be a third World War. She said a boy in her class said that someone had made a bomb which could blow up half of the world. She added nervously, “Things can be settled by talking instead of bombs.” She didn’t want to discuss it with me—I have always hoped I guess that I would somehow be able to protect the children from that particular horror. It is terrible for a child to become aware of something at so young an age that parents have no control over. I hope that they will be able to get enough out of the good things that life offers to counteract the potential horrors. I still have a nightmare once in a long while about jet planes flying over low and dropping bombs. This started during the Korean War. How horrible it must be for youngsters who are actually living in those war-torn countries.”

I subscribed to the Redding Record Searchlight.

February 7th—Just got back from the music class and am sort of watching Sonny and Cher on TV. 25 people showed up for the class including Fred Esselink and Mike Quinn. I was especially pleased to see Fred there and catch up on what he’d been doing.

The snow was gone and frogs were croaking. Rebecca stopped going to Warm Mt. School at her request and I started sending Jeff three days a week. We decided to try to lean on Weaverville Elementary School to do more for her. I visited her classroom one morning and Bob and I had an appointment with Meg Challis.

Bob went to Garberville Wednesday and got back Friday. Saturday we all went to Redding to look at pianos.

I started interviewing people for the Shasta College survey. It took time but was interesting.

On February 12th I took the three children to Florence and Leonard’s for us all to stay overnight. Bob had gone to Garberville. We were there so I could go skiing at Mt. Shasta with Bev Forero, getting up at 6 a.m. She was taking her two daughters and two of their friends and a 23-year old family friend. I tried to sleep in the same bed with Jeffrey (Rebecca refused to, she said he kicked too much.) He kicked too much. Not only that he had a croupy cough and was restless, poking me in the eye with his fingers. About 1 a.m. I moved into bed with Rebecca. She kicked some too. After I got up I drove over to Forero’s and had some breakfast. It was foggy and cold. We stopped in Redding so some of the children could rent skis and arrived in Mt. Shasta about 10:30.

Bev and I stayed on the rope tow. I took half an hour off for lunch and another half hour later. Otherwise, I was going up and down until the tow stopped at 4. It was a beautiful, clear, warm day and I had a marvelous time–the snow was packed powder. Took a lesson in the afternoon—all those years I was trying to ski I didn’t know I was supposed to edge the skis in on a turn—sure makes a difference. We munched sandwiches on the way home and got back to Weaverville around 8:00. I went to get the children and found that Bob had come home that night (I’d not expected him until the next day) and had taken the children and their luggage home. So I went home. Jeffrey and Clarke were asleep but Rebecca was waiting up.

A couple of days later I was still sore from holding up the rope. It was really heavy by the end of the day.

https://actdivenorcal.com/the-turbulent-historoy-of-mt-shasta-old-ski-bowl/

Rebecca, Jeff and I went over to see the Wilkin’s raccoon. (not sure how long they kept it but a nephew had given it to Al). It was about 8-months old. Really cute but a pest. Marne described it as part cat, part badger and part possum. It was very active and kept jumping up to grab the leg of the adults or Jeff’s arm. And then it chewed. When it was on its back it drew its hind legs up like our cat did so the claws could rake. Its fur was soft and three to four inches long. The rings on the tail were quite narrow and a reddish brown. The toes were long and slender. It loved water and played in the water from the hose when Jeffrey held the hose. It had learned to open sliding and folding doors. Because it kept jumping up we didn’t stay long.

Bob went to Garberville again for a couple of days. I went, with the children, to pick up Christi Forero and brought her back to watch the children while I went to my music class and then to a film Dave Ohde was showing on ecology narrated by Ian McHarg. The last 15 minutes were the most interesting—land use overlays were used to illustrate. Others there included the John Fields, the Murphys, Jean Breeden and two of her children, Jane Armstrong, Chuck Hamilton, the Wilkins. Then went back to music class and practiced. I think Bev picked Christi up.

On the 15th I got the car lubed, etc. and a tune-up. In the afternoon after ballet, we went to the grocery store to get tangerines, oranges and nuts to take as gifts to Moon and Dorothy Lee for their Chinese New Year open house. We bought some red paper in which to wrap them. After dinner I went over to get Patty Forero to stay with Clarke. He cried but she said he soon calmed down. We walked over to the Moon Lee’s. The children took their flashlights and gifts. There were a lot of people there and a number of children. The kids seemed to have a good time. Jeffrey spent a good deal of time sampling goodies and was quite open about asking for more. He had had a nap so was fine but Rebecca was tired and we left around 9:15. Bev picked up Patty.

February 1972

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The afternoon that I got back from hiking up Glennison Gap, Candy Fields came with Carin and left her with us while she went t a nurse’s meeting. Clarke tried to bug Carin by waving his hand near her face but Jeffrey took her under his wing.

Bob Gravette called and asked whether I would help in making a survey for Shasta College and I said I would.

Rebecca lost two teeth in one week—one while biting into a dill pickle and the other by biting a hard snowball.

My mother was in the hospital in Seattle again having surgery on her hip.

On Tuesday, the 25th, there was about five inches of snow on the ground. Bob Hooper picked up Rebecca to take her to school and Dennis Hooper came over around 10 to play with Jeff. I was going to take the truck out and get chains put on at a service station but decided to put chains on the VW myself because it was easier to travel with children in the VW than in the truck. It took me about ½ hour to get the chains on what with cold hands, feeding children lunch, and general struggle with the snow. I took Dennis to school and went to the post office.

Later Alice Jones came over with a tape from Peter for me to listen to with her–describing a meeting with some prominent conservationists including Brandenberg, who is the head of the Wilderness Society. Things got very political within the conservation organizations. Peter was doing some studies on the Redwood National Park area as well as other forest types. He was in Wisconsin looking over forest practices there.

After Alice left I got Clarke up and we went over to the elementary school for a conference with Rebecca’s teacher. We decided to start having Rebecca stay after school on Mondays to see whether she can get more accomplished on a one-to-one basis. “I really think most of Rebecca’s time there this year has been wasted. It’s not the teacher’s fault. She has some real rowdies in there.” I brought the Hooper’s kids up to our place so they could attend their conference.

Best buddies from way back.

The next day The next day I took Jeffrey and Anne Marie out to Warm Mt. School. The door on the driver’s side of the car was frozen shut. Took off the chains by the Meyer’s place. The road from the Hayfork Highway out was slick with a skim of packed snow. I stayed awhile and played my accordion. Clarke was into everything including paint, which he got all over his hands and face. Jeff wanted to leave when I did so he came home. Rebecca went to public school that day because she had some things about Japan to share. It was snowing hard and we took the truck over to get chains put on.

I was supposed to go to Redding Friday for training for the Shasta College survey but needed to take the car, not the truck. I managed to get one chain on but not the other. George Halcomb came and plowed our driveway and I made it down to Oregon St. but couldn’t make it up the hill from there so I called and cancelled. The meeting down there started at 9:30. A couple of hours later I would have been fine. Discovered I’d done something dumb with the chains, twisted one and that’s why it wouldn’t go on. Put the other one on upside down—things like that seem to happen with hurrying and children. (these were real chains, not the cable things most use now) Bob called from Bakersfield and was to fly to SF that night, drive to Palo Alto and go to the library at Stanford and then come home.

Bob Hooper gave Rebecca a ride to school again. Sharon Kennedy, from Lewiston, was going to come to the house to show me how to do the survey on Monday.

I was working on an article for Ranger Rick Nature Magazine about how Linda Ohde lived on a lookout.

“Rebecca came home yesterday from school and told me there would be a third World War. She said a boy in her class said that someone had made a bomb which could blow up half of the world. She added nervously, “Things can be settled by talking instead of bombs.” She didn’t want to discuss it with me—I have always hoped I guess that I would somehow be able to protect the children from that particular horror. It is terrible for a child to become aware of something at so young an age that parents have no control over. I hope that they will be able to get enough out of the good things that life offers to counteract the potential horrors. I still have a nightmare once in a long while about jet planes flying over low and dropping bombs. This started during the Korean War. How horrible it must be for youngsters who are actually living in those war-torn countries.”

I subscribed to the Redding Record Searchlight.

February 7th—Just got back from the music class and am sort of watching Sonny and Cher on TV. 25 people showed up for the class including Fred Esselink and Mike Quinn. I was especially pleased to see Fred there and catch up on what he’d been doing.

The snow was gone and frogs were croaking. Rebecca stopped going to Warm Mt. School at her request and I started sending Jeff three days a week. We decided to try to lean on Weaverville Elementary School to do more for her. I visited her classroom one morning and Bob and I had an appointment with Meg Challis.

Bob went to Garberville Wednesday and got back Friday. Saturday we all went to Redding to look at pianos.

I started interviewing people for the Shasta College survey. It took time but was interesting.

On February 12th I took the three children to Florence and Leonard’s for us all to stay overnight. Bob had gone to Garberville. We were there so I could go skiing at Mt. Shasta with Bev Forero, getting up at 6 a.m. She was taking her two daughters and two of their friends and a 23-year old family friend. I tried to sleep in the same bed with Jeffrey (Rebecca refused to, she said he kicked too much.) He kicked too much. Not only that he had a croupy cough and was restless, poking me in the eye with his fingers. About 1 a.m. I moved into bed with Rebecca. She kicked some too. After I got up I drove over to Forero’s and had some breakfast. It was foggy and cold. We stopped in Redding so some of the children could rent skis and arrived in Mt. Shasta about 10:30.

Bev and I stayed on the rope tow. I took half an hour off for lunch and another half hour later. Otherwise, I was going up and down until the tow stopped at 4. It was a beautiful, clear, warm day and I had a marvelous time–the snow was packed powder. Took a lesson in the afternoon—all those years I was trying to ski I didn’t know I was supposed to edge the skis in on a turn—sure makes a difference. We munched sandwiches on the way home and got back to Weaverville around 8:00. I went to get the children and found that Bob had come home that night (I’d not expected him until the next day) and had taken the children and their luggage home. So I went home. Jeffrey and Clarke were asleep but Rebecca was waiting up.

A couple of days later I was still sore from holding up the rope. It was really heavy by the end of the day.

https://activenorcal.com/the-turbulent-history-of-mt-shasta-old-ski-bowl/

Rebecca, Jeff and I went over to see the Wilkin’s raccoon. (not sure how long they kept it but a nephew had given it to Al). It was about 8-months old. Really cute but a pest. Marne described it as part cat, part badger and part possum. It was very active and kept jumping up to grab the leg of the adults or Jeff’s arm. And then it chewed. When it was on its back it drew its hind legs up like our cat did so the claws could rake. Its fur was soft and three to four inches long. The rings on the tail were quite narrow and a reddish brown. The toes were long and slender. It loved water and played in the water from the hose when Jeffrey held the hose. It had learned to open sliding and folding doors. Because it kept jumping up we didn’t stay long.

Bob went to Garberville again for a couple of days. I went, with the children, to pick up Christi Forero and brought her back to watch the children while I went to my music class and then to a film Dave Ohde was showing on ecology narrated by Ian McHarg. The last 15 minutes were the most interesting—land use overlays were used to illustrate. Others there included the John Fields, the Murphys, Jean Breeden and two of her children, Jane Armstrong, Chuck Hamilton, the Wilkins. Then went back to music class and practiced. I think Bev picked Christi up.

On the 15th I got the car lubed, etc. and a tune-up. In the afternoon after ballet, we went to the grocery store to get tangerines, oranges and nuts to take as gifts to Moon and Dorothy Lee for their Chinese New Year open house. We bought some red paper in which to wrap them. After dinner I went over to get Patty Forero to stay with Clarke. He cried but she said he soon calmed down. We walked over to the Moon Lee’s. The children took their flashlights and gifts. There were a lot of people there and a number of children. The kids seemed to have a good time. Jeffrey spent a good deal of time sampling goodies and was quite open about asking for more. He had had a nap so was fine but Rebecca was tired and we left around 9:15. Bev picked up Patty.

Glennison Gap 1972

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There was a week in January, 1972, when Bob was out of town and we got several snowstorms. January 24th –Did housework and ran errands in the morning. At noon Jeff and Clarke and I went over to Florence’s to have lunch. Then, leaving the boys there, I went up to hike on the Glennison Gap Road.

“It was a a great hour-and- a -half. I walked up to where there was snow, in places up to six inches deep. Snow coated the trees and the sun was just beginning to make the snow fall with little soft splats. The silence was complete except for the noise of the melting snow—and an occasional call of a nuthatch. I did see deer tracks and what I think were fox tracks. I walked fairly rapidly, stopping only to take pictures and admire the scenery; my legs were aching, and I was panting pretty heavily going up the hill. Went about ½ mile past the 2nd forks (where the sign says Glennison Gap 2 miles). By then the snow was to my boot tops and it was time to turn back. The wind must have been strong up there as one side of the trees was covered with fluffs of powdery snow.”

There are no angles in snow,
no angles where snow covers the road
or coats the trees;
no angles where it covers angled rocks and boulders;
no angles where blue shadows fall
or where my footsteps press the flakes to the earth.
Angles there may be in sunlight’s sparkle—
but the dappled smoothness of shadow and light helps
create the silence and beauty of fallen snow.

Rearranged a few words but otherwise this is as I found it in my notes.

I hurried home just in time to catch up with Rebecca walking up the driveway after school. Picked her up and went to get the boys.

End of 1971–1972 Begins

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Photo near Glennison Gap

The day after my 33rd birthday I wrote that ”it was not the best one but typical of ordinary days. Bob had stomach flu the night before and was home in bed all day. I did a lot of housework. He gave me two blouses and a denim mini-skirt; Jeff a brightly flowered cookie can (I just gave that to Good Will a few months ago—couldn’t remember where it had come from, sorry Jeff); Rebecca a Teflon cake pan. I was up most of next night not feeling well. Took a nap when the kids did. “

“We had snow this last week and the children played with the disk and plastic bathtub this weekend. Clarke loved sliding in the bathtub—when it would tip over he’d lie there on his back, clutching the sides—like a little stuffed doll. Rebecca and Jeffrey were pulling on snow-covered branches knocking snow off on each other’s heads.”

Friday (10th) Bob, Rebecca, Jeffrey and I and Jenni Hooper went to Redding to see the Ballet Celeste group put on the Nutcracker. We gulped a hamburger there and then went to the Civic Auditorium. Saw Kay and Dick there with Michael, Kathleen, and Kenny and Karen Austin. Van Duyns came bringing Linda Ohde and Liquita Weldon. Eventually all the children ended up on the main floor with Van Duyns. It was a lot cooler there. The performance was pretty good—the children seemed to enjoy if. We had trouble keeping Jeffrey awake because he’d not had a nap. Went to Sambos afterwards for sundaes, which took forever because there was only one waitress—we were with the Van Duyn group. John and Jeffrey had both chosen Mickey Mouse shirts for the occasion. Got home around 11:30. Clear although it was snowing when we had left Weaverville.

Saturday Bob went to Redding. I’d left my purse at Sambos so he picked it up while he was down there. Fortunately everything was still in it.

Sunday he went up on Oregon Mt. to check the translators and get a tree. We had about 8 inches of snow on the ground and it was still snowing. He got a sugar pine.

Sunday morning I walked downtown and went over to Florence and Leonard’s to try on the patchwork skirt Florence made for me. She did a beautiful job. Bob bought a jersey blouse to go with it. She also made a fringed shawl. She was making skirts for Rebecca, Robin and Noel also. When I got home I made the children go out and play because I’d had such a good time. They had a good time. Linda Lindsey had taken Clarke for overnight on Friday, which was a big help.

Bob got appointed to the Trinity County Air Pollution Board along with Vic Rose (from Trin-Co) and Rev. Richards (Baptist Minister).

On Friday, the 16th I substituted for Tom Clarke (business class) and also worked in the office a little while. That night Bob and I went to the Rotary Christmas dinner. I wore the beautiful patchwork skirt and had my hair put up right after school (Very rare occurrence). Had many compliments on the outfit and the hair. Saturday we went to Garberville to their Christmas dinner. We took Rebecca to Van Duyn’s who took her to see Santa Claus and to her teacher’s wedding, which was at 4 p.m., and then to Florence and Leonard’s afterwards. Jeff and Clarke went to Linda Lindsey’s. She took Jeffrey and Ronald to see Santa. Florence picked them up around 5. Then they got Anne Armstrong to babysit in the evening while they went out. Late Sunday morning they took the children to our house, along with Jan Goodyear.

We had a good drive over—very pretty—clear. Snowy mountains above. The willows along the river were red and yellow stemmed. Saturday night we went to the Garberville phone company dinner at Tarentino’s in Redway. We stopped to look at the work being done on the new commercial office. Sunday it was clear on the coast but we ran into fog on Berry Summit and were in it from there to Weaverville. We came home, ate a sandwich, changed and went to Senta Moore’s for an hour for her open house.

I’ve been working a lot on making Christmas presents. Sunday night Bob put up the tree and the children and I decorated it. Clarke was very good about leaving the decorations alone. Bob also put up the four light fixtures in his study Sunday night.

I made some clothes for Rebecca’s Sasha doll, a placemat and joke crying towel for Jane Van Duyn, a book for Michael and one for the Van Duyn baby (plastic pages sewn together); helped Rebecca and Jeffrey make gifts for each other—a salt- box bank for Jeff and a hat for Sasha (it started out as a marble sack); a contact- paper covered cardboard box (toy box) for Clarke from Jeffrey and a stuffed horse from Rebecca. Rebecca made a gift for Bob and me at school. Jeff covered a plastic wastebasket with drawings for Bob. I got him to put cloves in an orange for me.

Bob brought home gifts from the Sanders and Van Duyns. I picked up a box load of clothes at Jones’ today—recycled from Peter and Angenett’s children.

Jenni Hooper was here for three hours and the children made salt and flour Christmas- tree decorations.

On the 24th we ate dinner with Fred and Jeanne Meyer and family, including her parents. Then we drove around town looking at lights and finally home to sing a few carols and hang up stockings. I was up later doing gift- wrapping. Was awake late, thinking.

In the morning no one woke up until 7:30. I took stockings into our room. Had to wake Clarke up so he could play with his stocking gifts. Bob told the kids he heard someone take his car keys during the night and had heard the trunk slam. He and Rebecca and Jeffery went out and they brought in a long, heavy package (a new screen to show our slides). We’d been showing them on the refrigerator.

Rebecca got a watch from us and a Gregor doll from Santa. Dana gave her a loom and she soon made two hot pads, Jeff got a bulldozer and a fire engine from Santa and a GI Joe from Florence and Leonard (I was glad he had no concept of military in conjunction with that). He seemed to enjoy being able to dress and undress it without having someone yell at him for playing with their doll. I gave Bob a harmonica, the Trinity, and a note saying I’d pay for ½ of the blackboard for his office. He purchased tickets for Swan Lake for Rebecca, himself and me and an extra for Linda Ohde if Rebecca wanted her to go.

Saturday we went over to Florence and Leonard’s where, for the first time for me, I met many of Linda Lindsey’s relatives—her sister Jeanne and family and a brother Bill. After they left Florence had dinner for Alice and Horace Jones, Dixon and Heather, Walter and Dorothy Miller, Dick and Kay and family, Aunt Nell, etc.

The next day I called my parents and talked to them and my brother Richard and wife who were there for Christmas.


This photo shows Linda Lindsey, Craig, Ron and Jeff near Trinity Lake.

Senta took care of Clarke and Scott at Linda’s and the rest of us went out to Slate Creek to slide in the snow. We were going to meet Nancy and Florence and five more kids there. Ours were having a great time when a highway patrolman drove up leading three carloads of children to our spot. So we left and went back looking for Florence. They’d just arrived at a place near Kinney Camp and were tramping snow to get there. We went with them and Jeff started collapsing from cold and hunger. It was really hard work for little legs to go through the snow. About a hundred yards from the road we stopped and ate lunch standing up. Finally emptied most of a thermos of hot water I had with me over each of his feet, which helped a little. Struggled back to the car where he and others warmed up while the older children played.

I subbed for a week and two days in Mr. Ehlerding’s classes—German, Geometry and Trig. Right? I had the German I classes looking up information about Germany for brief reports and also, Walter Miller was good enough to come and show slides to all the German classes. I managed to stumble along with geometry but trig was impossible. The next day they were to get a permanent sub who could speak German.

January 11th we had asked if Nancy Van Duyn could come over after ballet. Jan Hooper asked if we could take Jenni because she wasn’t going to be home so we had five children until after 5 pm. Nancy stayed for dinner.

“Candy Fields called and told me the Douglas City School Board had had a meeting the night before–a woman had complained about a teacher’s aide there wearing a headband. Hippies wear headbands, therefore the aide was a hippy. Then discussion went on to Warm Mt. School. Wilma Smith had called Bob Gravette and he had called Sacramento and been told that it was illegal to go to one school three days a week and another two days a week. We doubt that this is so. I went out to tell Mike and Janet about it. “

7:30 phone call to sub for Mrs. Giovenetti. I rushed and barely made it by 8:30. I really didn’t want to work that day and was quite cross with the 1st class. Was able to leave at 2 though to go pick up children.

Florence and Leonard brought up the blackboard and had Kathleen with them. They were taking her to see Black Beauty and offered to take Rebecca and Jeff. They came by for them around 7. The movie wasn’t over until nearly 9:00. I was able to get Clarke to bed and get some housework done.

On the 18th, after the children were in bed, we had a good talk, going in depth on things until almost midnight. Very satisfying. The children were very happy to see that their father had returned the next day and climbed up on the bed to wrestle with him.

The next day Rebecca came down with some unknown thing that included a rash. Bob was going to fly to Garberville but the weather was too bad so they turned back at South Fork Mnt., drove over and stayed overnight. I varnished the hall again.

Bob called from near Willow Creek on his way back saying they were going to eat there and then called from Junction City saying he was going to meet Jim Barrett at the office and wouldn’t be be home till 10:30 or so. This was turning into a rough month for him.

Rebecca was home, sick, all week. Jeff went Wednesday and Friday to Warm Mt. School. Friday they went to the auction in Redding. Jeff apparently had a great time—said he even got to bounce on a waterbed at a furniture store on the way home. Didn’t get home till after 5.

I spray-painted the old desk Bob got from the high school—put about 10 coats of orange on the wood and a coat of gray on the metal. Put it in the kitchen next to the sink. I’d totally forgotten this desk.

Bob had to leave the next day around noon to drive to S.F. from where he would fly to Victorville and be gone all week.

That afternoon Rebecca commented,” Most Daddies are home on weekends and at night.”

Jeffery had said that morning,” I didn’t get a chance to talk to Daddy.”
Clarke follows him around when he gets the chance. His biggest treat is to ride on his father’s shoulders. Maybe after this week he can spend more time with them.

“I don’t even want to change our bed…it’s a little like he’s still here. We’ve had such a good week. I really miss him when he’s gone for so long. I worry abut him too because this isn’t really what he wants to be doing—and yet he works so hard at it and spends such long hours.”

Jeffrey has started to read and is sounding out words.

On the Saturday after Bob left I took the children to the library after going to Varney’s. When we go to Varney’s, Rebecca and Jeffrey always have a doughnut and colored lemonade—purple, pink or green. Then they read comics while I finish my coffee and Clarke chews on a doughnut. I found another Wallace Stegner book at the library.

October-November 1971

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Early October, a warm day: Stopped on the way back from Warm Mt. School with Jeff so he could watch the loader clumping logs into the mill pond. He really liked the big splashes. Even Clarke was straining from his car seat to see what was going on.

I put in a picture of the Upper Ranch just to have some fall colors~

The previous weekend, when I was picking grapes out at the ranch, I heard squeaking near my feet and found a baby meadow mouse with its eyes still closed. I took it down to the house to show the children and the two older ones each took a turn holding it. When I put the little creature back in the grape leaves the mother came and got it.

I talked to my dad on the phone. He’d brought my mother home and was managing so far. He said he had had a cup of coffee with Leonard when he left here and then stopped to see the Hislops in Redding. When he got to Castella he talked to Joe Ammirati and called the McLeod’s so he didn’t get home to Nehalem until midnight. I talked to my mother for a few minutes but she could only say “I know” and “well”. So tragic. My dad said she was trying to write with her left hand. He had ordered a wheelchair for her.

One Sunday I took Eric and Linda Ohde and Rebecca out to the ranch to pick apples. I dropped Clarke off at Linda Lindsey’s and when she asked whether any of my kids wanted to go on a picnic with them Jeff opted to do that. They went out to the Canyon Creek cabin where they played in the sand and ate watermelon. After we picked apples we stopped at Big Bar Station for milkshakes on the way home.

Clarke had words for foot, bird, clock, ball and daddy.

October 13th: Bob went to a school board meeting. John Underwood called and asked me to be a judge for the high school float parade.

On a Saturday Bob went looking for the store truck so he could haul culvert. It turned out to be in Lewiston at Dick’s and Dick had hidden the key someplace in the house. Bob ended up hot-wiring it and going to Redding to get culvert, hauling it out to the ranch, then returning the truck. The next day he drove our pickup and Mike and Tim Quinn, along with Marlen Lee to help put in the culvert. He put a dam across the upper end of the culvert, just below the house, and extended the downspout. The boys were good workers and he was pleased with the results.

I went out with the children around noon and built fires in the stoves because it was cold outside but no one came in. I did heat up water for tea for them though. I picked two boxes of red apples and two of green. Rebecca and Jeff wanted to help so I let them go up the ladder and pick some toward the end. We got home around six but Bob not till nearly 8. About 8:30 the fire siren went off and when I went outside I could see a red glow out West Weaver toward Hooper’s. Their guesthouse burned.

I subbed Friday afternoon at the high school .

Bob left for Victorville again. He drove to Sacramento and then flew from there and would be gone all week. Gilda Sanders called to tell me about two service award dinners that were coming up the next week.

Called my parents again. My mother was starting therapy two days a week at the general hospital. Her leg was hurting a lot.

The high school called and wanted me to sub and I said no. The next day Lewiston called but I couldn’t teach because I was committed to judging the parade. Marne Wilkins, Walter Miller, Mike Harris, a woman I didn’t know, and I were the judges on Friday. Rebecca and Jeff watched from near the Joss House with the Warm Mt. school group and I picked them up there. Clarke was at Linda’s.

Bob got home late Friday night. We went to the cabaret Saturday night, put on by the Republican women. I wrote that I hadn’t laughed that much in a long time.

It was almost the end of the month. We went to Florence and Leonard’s for Cheryl’s 18th birthday. One afternoon I took care of Matt Hooper for an hour as Jan had to make a sudden trip to Redding. That evening we got Christy Forero to babysit so we could go to Cedar Stock Resort with Del Williams from Victorville (picked him up at the airport) for a Service Awards dinner. The next day Bob, Del Williams and I left for Garberville for the Service Awards dinner for that area at the Benbow Inn. Gilda Sanders, Barbara Dewitt and Jim Barrett were there too. The children stayed with Florence and Leonard. The next day we flew back in the company plane.

We were both really tired that day but Bob went down to the office that night.

It started snowing October 30th around 9 a.m. By evening there was just a skim on the ground. I took the children over to see the Great Pumpkin Contest. Rebecca and Jeffrey stayed to eat lunch, then went out to Warm Mt. School and Janet and Mike brought them back about 4.

I made Jeffrey a sheet ghost costume. Rebecca wore an Indian costume that Cheryl had worn. Sunday I took Robin Meyer, Rebecca and Jeff trick-or-treating, then to the Parish House where we met Peter, the exchange student from Switzerland. The children crawled through a spook tunnel and watched a little puppet show.

November 2nd—went to Redding to do a little Christmas shopping, leaving Jeffrey and Clarke with Linda Lindsey. Got back about three in time for a conference with Meg Challis and Pat Nunn (from Weaverville Elementary School). Bob had gone to Garberville the night before and wasn’t home yet at 11 p.m.

A couple of days later Jeffrey had a temperature of 102 and I was hoping he’d be well enough by the next night to go to a marionette show in Redding. He was, and I left Clarke with Linda for an hour—then Bob picked him up—and took Robin Meyer, Rebecca and Jeff, and Bev and John Forero. We met the Meyer family there and saw Mike and Janet, Mary Ann with Susie and Scot, Mrs. Parkan and others. The marionette program was excellent—“Hansel and Gretel” this time. Afterwards our group went to Sambos for sundaes, getting home around 11. Jeff slept going down and coming back; John and Rebecca coming back. That was a Thursday.

Saturday we went out to the ranch, meeting Bob at the creek for lunch. He cut the big log in the creek into three pieces. We stayed until he was through using the chainsaw, then went up to the house. Brad Miller came out with his boom truck to try to lift the logs out of the creek but all he succeeded in doing was breaking the boom. Bob went with Brad when we left so he could give Brad a key to the gate so he could get his truck out.

It was warm in the sun but chilly when the sun disappeared. I stayed warm because I was picking apples and hauling the ladder around but the children got chilly and quarrelsome so I hurried through with it. The biggest and best apples were up on top of the trees, out of reach. The doe and her fawn were in the orchard with us.

Sunday Bob worked putting molding and the door sill in his shop. He had two coats of varnish on the walls, the molding on and the floor tiled.

Both ducks disappeared. They either just took off or got eaten by something.

Jeffrey washed most of the breakfast dishes one morning.

November 10: Bob had gone to Garberville the day before. He was supposed to come home on the 10th but I called Gilda that afternoon and she said he’d be home the next night. That evening Teresa Blair called and told me the same thing—he had gone over with Ray. He was supposed to meet some PUC people but the weather was too bad so they were going to try again the next day.

That afternoon I went to pick up Jeff but left him there because he wanted to participate in making bread sticks. I decided I might start leaving him out there for a whole day since we got charged for a whole day for him anyway. “I am still concerned about the fly situation and noticed the restrooms weren’t clean. I hope no one gets the public health people out there. They are so good with the children.” (reading this now I can’t believe it’s me! I’m such a germ freak.) Clarke had a cold and had been “following me around for three days, fussing.”

November 17th: We left the children with Florence and Leonard and drove to San Francisco, eating dinner in Redding, arriving at Candy Fields’ cousin’s around 10:15. They lived in one of those old brown Victorian type houses with narrow rooms and high ceilings. The cousin, a building contractor, had painted the house in bright colors; his wife had done a lot of decorating and had collected a lot of old furniture. (I have trouble believing we actually arrived at the home of someone we didn’t know at 10:15 p.m.) The next day we went to Stacy’s Bookstore in S.F. and a bookstore in Sausalito. We went to dinner at a place in Oakland that was made from an old railroad station and railroad cars. From there we went to the opera. “Our seats were grand tier and we were in the front row, right in the middle—Il Trovatore. It was great—ponderous, grey, gloomy sets, etc. We especially enjoyed the gypsy.”

We left S.F. after breakfast the next day and got back to Weaverville about 5:30. Picked up the children at Senta Moore’s. Florence had taken them to Linda’s and she had taken them to Senta’s. They were fed and ready to go home.

I got sick at 2 a.m. and was sick for the next two days. Linda took the kids Monday so I could rest.

“Bob had to be in Covelo Monday night and back here Tuesday morning so he could meet Bob Powell and another man at the airport. They went to Hayfork and Hyampom Tuesday afternoon and to Trinity Center Tuesday night. He got back at 8:30 Tuesday night with no dinner yet and wasn’t feeling very well. Ate soup and crackers. I’m really getting worried about him with this frantic schedule he is on. Today he left at 7:30 and was going to Willow Creek, Hoopa, then flying to Garberville. He’ll be back tomorrow night. “

I was supposed to substitute Monday and Tuesday but I called to say I couldn’t. Bev Forero worked instead. Jan Hooper wanted me to watch Matt on Wednesday but I told her I wasn’t feeling up to it plus I had Rebecca home with a sore throat and swollen tonsils. “Rebecca asked me tonight if I’d be alive when she got married. I told her I hoped so…that both Bob’s and my parents were alive when we were married and are still alive. She has discussed the death of the Nichols boy’s father with him and this may be bothering her. Plus she may have been reading some things about death in some books like the Nancy Drew books, etc. “

Rebecca stayed home Wednesday, Thursday and Friday. She went to school the following Monday but Pat Nunn called and said she wasn’t feeling well so I went to get her. She took a nap and then went to piano lessons. Bob was in Garberville Monday night.

“Friday night I went to Redding with Candy Fields to see the Yugoslavian folk Dance group at the Civic Center. It was an excellent performance and, even though I was still quite tired, I enjoyed it very much.”

Bob spent most of the weekend working on putting the supports in for his bookshelves. Saturday I walked downtown with the children. Took the wagon and pulled Clarke once in awhile. We went to the library. Met Bob at the Brewery for lunch. Jeff rode home with him and Rebecca, Clarke and I walked. Sunday we drove to Lewiston and back so Bob could look at a building there that someone in Garberville might have wanted to use for a plastic furniture factory.

Jan Goodyear babysat Monday night so I could go to my music class. I substituted Tuesday. Bob spent most of the following Friday on Oregon Mt. and that Sunday afternoon went up to work more on the translators. It was after 10 pm when he called and was on his way down—still hadn’t had dinner. He said there was about six inches of snow up there.

We invited Chuck and Pat Hamilton and their two children, Linda and Paul, for Thanksgiving dinner. “Bob spent most of the day cleaning up things in and out of the house—driving me frantic! Rebecca had an apple drying for a doll’s head and that ended up in the garbage but was rescued (later Clarke picked up the doll, chewed on the head and nearly swallowed a straight pin that was holding the eyes (beads) on). Anyhow, we put two tables together, used the linen tablecloth and everyone seemed to have a good time. We had a 21 lb. 14 oz. turkey. “

Called my dad and he said my oldest brother and family were on their way down to see them Friday.

Bob worked in his shop putting up shelves and Florence and Leonard told him they had a desk he could have.

I was reading a book called Teaching as a Subversive Activity and wishing I could teach that way.

Monday the high school called and wanted me to substitute for a teacher who had had her wisdom teeth removed and wanted me to be there by 9:20. I got dressed, washed dishes, gathered Clarke’s stuff together and took Jeffrey and Clarke to Linda’s, Clarke still in his pajamas. The teacher had her roll book at home so I had a time with that. Tuesday I took sheets of paper around and put names down but received at least one fictitious name. I subbed Tuesday and Wednesday also. No big problems except for one World History class that really gave me a bad time. Monday night I went to my music class and gave Dick DeRosear the book Teaching as Subversive Activity.

Bob went up on Oregon Mt. Tuesday night again and finished up there. I typed a letter for him to the Translator Company so he could get paid for his efforts.

Early Fall 1971

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Thursday, September 16, 1971

“I’m sitting on the couch, watching TV—nearly 10 p.m. Bob has been in Victorville since last Sunday. He’ll be back late tomorrow night. Drove to Sacramento and flew from there. “

Last Friday we camped overnight with all three children on Boulder Creek at Jones’s place. Horace’s nephew and wife were in the upper camp. Friday morning I had gone out to Warm Mt. School with Rebecca and Jeffrey. In the afternoon I had a doctor’s appointment that took longer than expected so didn’t get things packed and out to Boulder Creek until 7 p.m. While I was loading the car Rebecca and Jeffrey were fighting and crying. I put water in the ducks’ cages and one escaped so I had to chase it down, with Rebecca’s tearful help.

“After we got out there I put Clarke in the pack and made three or four trips down and up the hill. I’d left the sleeping bags and crib for Bob to bring. Got a fire started and Rebecca and Jeff eating in the dark. Was beginning to think Bob had forgotten when he finally arrived about 8:30, cussing and stumbling down the trail—the cart load dumping over once or twice. Fortunately, I’d brought marshmallows and Rebecca and Jeffrey roasted marshmallows while Bob and I ate. Bob blew up air mattresses while I washed dishes. We got the kids to bed around 9:30. Of course they woke up about 6:30 with pleased smiles on their faces that they were sleeping outdoors. We ate bacon and eggs and I toasted bread on the iron slab of the stove. Bob slept in and had breakfast in bed. The children roasted marshmallows again right after breakfast. Later they played in the creek and admired Bob’s ability to leap from rock to rock. We had to leave about 2:00 so Bob could get some work done at the office. “

I substituted at Lewiston Tuesday and Wednesday last week and all this week too. Don Giovannetti had an appendectomy and I substituted with his 5th graders. “ I’m really exhausted. Rebecca catches the bus at 8:00. We get up at 6:30. I leave around 8:20, drop Jeff and Clarke at Linda Lindsey’s, and get to Lewiston about 9:00 when school starts. Get back to Weaverville around 4:00. The school kids really push me because they’re used to a very strict teacher and I’m not strict. So we argue and fight and sometimes have a good time in spite of it all. And then come home and fight with Rebecca and Jeffrey who are really beginning to fall apart after all this rushing. “

Leonard brought the jeep up from where Bob had parked it downtown.

“Jeff had a temperature of 103 degrees yesterday when I got home but was cooler tonight.”

Rebecca went to an auction in Redding with Janet and Mike but I kept Jeffrey home because he would get too tired and not get much out of it. I was concerned about the lack of seatbelts in their van.

We were having a heat wave. It was terribly hot out on the paved playground at Lewiston during the lunch hour and P.E.

Bob had gotten home around 10 p.m. Friday night. Saturday we drove to Garberville. Clarke stayed with Linda Lindsey. (Linda, if you read this, thank you so much for taking such good care of the children!) We ate dinner at a Chinese restaurant in Eureka. After breakfast the next day we drove to Richardson Grove State Park and took a short walk through the redwoods. Ate some huckleberries, picked up tanoak acorn cups, etc. Lots of moss on the trees and along the trail but it was very dry. We ended up at a kind of outdoor museum—a nature trail with many plaques and live or cut tree-demonstrations. Rebecca read many of them to us. Jeffrey was getting pretty tired and sleepy so we bought a burl and then walked back to the car. We drove down to Piercy expecting to eat there but nothing was open so we went back to Richardson Grove and ate at the Coffee Shop, then drove to Leggett so I could see what that looked like and Jeffrey could nap in the car on the way. Then back to Garberville and got to the picnic site at 1:30. There was a good turnout and lots of children. Many games including a board with darts and prizes for youngsters who popped a balloon. Jeff won a football and Rebecca a jump rope. Dinner was roasted whole pig and we watched them dig it up, unwrap layers of burlap, then aluminum foil before reaching the pig.

All the children’s pictures were from springtime.
Bob and I played horseshoes and volleyball and a little before 6:30 we drove to the airport. All of us and Teresa Blair flew home. At the last minute Sandy volunteered to stay so Bob could ride home with us. This was Jeffrey’s first plane ride and Rebecca’s second. My first trip in a small plane. “It was very exciting for me—there were small bumps, similar to being in an elevator—only sideways sliding at the same time. I got to see many of the places where Bob worked—Hoagen-Zinnia, Ruth Lake, etc. Lots of clear-cutting too. Mrs. Patton flew us—she just got married the day before—on a raft out in the lake. She flew over our house, banking so we could see it. A half-hour trip versus a 4.5 hour drive. We took Teresa home, then got Clarke and paid Linda.

September 22nd was a warm , sunny day after a cool morning. Mary Ann took Rebecca and Jeffrey out to Warm Mt. School. After Clarke’s morning nap he and I went down to Varney’s for a cup of coffee and to share a doughnut. We went out to get his siblings around noon and got back to town in time to take Rebecca to piano lessons with Mrs. Gott. Candy Fields came by just as I put the boys down for naps and stayed with them while I went to pick up Rebecca.

I rented a flute and Monday night went to my first music class. Later decided to drop it. Hard to play and didn’t want to keep paying rent for something I probably wouldn’t continue. Asked Dick DeRosear whether he would help me learn to play my accordion better on music nights.

The following Thursday I finished cleaning up the wood scraps left from the siding work and stacked them in the woodshed along with some of the firewood that Terry Rhinehart had brought (2 cords for $75). Took the children with me down to the pump house and cut the weeds that surrounded it so Rebecca could stand under the eaves in bad weather when she was waiting for the bus.

Friday I took Jeffrey and Susy Field out to Warm Mt. School. Rebecca wanted to go to public school. Florence called about noon and wanted me to eat lunch with her so we went to the A & W and Clarke played on the seat between us.

Doris reported to Dave that it had snowed on Weaver Bally on the 25th. She called it “fur-lined biffy seat weather”. My dad called to say he was coming down to look at places they might want to move to. My mother was still in rehab after her stroke. Bob would be gone all that week but I’d manage. We spent that weekend out at the ranch. Sunlight through fog and rain. Pretty. I picked squash, a few green beans and peas, many tomatoes. Also apples, which entailed getting much water down my sleeves from the wet leaves. Picked as many pears as I could reach. The refrigerator had defrosted because the gas had run out so I had to clean that up, which I hadn’t planned on–a sloppy, wet mess, moldy food, etc. Fortunately Clarke took a long nap and Rebecca and Jeff cooperated fairly well.

Bob cleaned up the pool and put the liner and frame upstairs—quite a job in itself. He put the tractor in the barn and some shakes he’d taken out there. We ate at Big Bar and after we got home he went down to the office and was still there when I was writing at 9 p.m.

I wrote again on October 2nd. Bob worked late Monday night and I couldn’t get a sitter so didn’t go to my music class. Tuesday he left to drive with some PUC people through most of his area. My dad arrived around 1:00. We had a jigger of brandy, some coffee, and I finally got a sandwich into him around 2:30. We grew up calling our parents by their first names, Mary and Ben.

On Wednesday Ben and I went in his pickup over to Junction City to look at land, taking Clarke with us. Then we went out to Warm Mt. School to pick up the children. It was pouring rain most of the morning. The children had made popcorn that morning and had gone down to the Lewiston Fish Hatchery to observe the salmon. That night I picked up Teresa Blair at her house and she babysat while my dad and I went to a Sierra Club meeting in Redding with Florence, Leonard and Horace. Randy Witters, U.S.F.S., talked about points mentioned in the last brochure on the Wilderness Area and showed some slides of man’s influences in the proposed area. We ate dinner at Candy’s Pancake House before the meeting and had coffee and ice cream afterwards. We got home around 11:30.

Thursday afternoon Ben and I drove out to look at Wilkins’, East Weaver, the area around Millers and Gott’s, etc. When we were nearly to the airport we saw a plane coming in–a turbo-jet. I wondered whether it might be Bob so we pulled up at the airport. It was him and we talked a few minutes and watched the plane take off before Bob went back to the office and we went on driving.

Friday my dad went over to see Horace Jones while Doris Ohde and I drove out to Warm Mt. School in her car to get the children. We picked up Jeanne Meyer and her 4-year-old daughter, Anne Marie. Jeanne was thinking about sending her older daughter, Robin, to the school. Jeanne’s husband, Fred, was a ranger at the Joss House.

Went with Ben out past the airport to look at a place owned by a Charles Bailey—two acres and a little house with a marvelous view of Weaver Bally—but they were asking $22,000 for it. They’d paid $12,500 for their place in Nehalem on 3 lots) Bob had to go to a potluck in Hayfork with his supervisory employees to discuss the rate case. He got back a little after 11 p.m.

My dad left the next morning. He was so thin and haggard looking, weeping often and easily and I felt so sorry for him and my mother. He talked almost constantly while he was there and seemed to need to do so disparately so I did very little housework. He also needed physical contact and fortunately the children helped provide that. Staying with my brother and family in Seattle wasn’t working well for him either. I was really depressed by the time he left. But he did say the trip had given him a whole new lease on life and I hoped it had—I really felt inadequate so far as being able to help him was concerned.

We ate venison one night. Leonard and friends had gotten a buck the last weekend.

Spent a beautiful day at the ranch. We dug up the potato plants and each of the children’s plants had a tiny potato on it. They were delighted although Rebecca voiced some concern about Jeffrey’s being a bit larger.

Conversation between children—I have no idea how this began:

Jeffrey: “God made everybody.”
Rebecca: “No, Mommy and Daddy made us.”
Jeffrey: “God made everybody but Clarke.”
Me: “What happened to Clarke?’
Jeffrey: “He was in your tummy.”
Rebecca: “So were you, Jeff.”
Rebecca: “What I want to know is, if there is a God, who made him?”
Jeffrey: “God made himself. He dignified and made himself.”

August-September 1971

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Roy Blair and Bob drove to S.F. to attend a symposium, leaving on a Monday night and getting back late Tuesday night.

Wednesday I drove into town and left the two boys with Linda while Rebecca and I went shopping for Jeff’s birthday gifts. It was to be a fireman’s party with fire hat invitations and a fire hat cake. I made the cake that night and decorated it the next morning before the party. Children came at 10:30 and went home at 12:30. Jeff had invited Dennis Hooper, John Van Duyne, Robbie Fox, Ronald Lindsey, and Forrest Hartman. Rebecca had invited Jenny Hooper to play with her and when Marilyn brought John over we asked Nancy to stay too. I had frozen nine snowballs during the last winter and we had just enough. I had Muff Wilkins there to help and Clarke was at Linda Lindsey’s.

Rebecca, Jeffrey and I watched a monarch butterfly emerge from its chrysalis. We raised four of them that summer. And the two polliwogs we’d been keeping in Weaverville finally got four legs so we turned them loose.

Rebecca enjoyed three days of ecology classes at Bill Harger’s—they were low key and involved a lot of humanitarian stuff too, which was probably good. I took Jeffrey the second time and spent the whole day but he slept for two hours in their bed, exhausted. The last day I left him at Linda’s, which was much better.

September 2nd was the next time I wrote and Bob and I were at Bear Lake. Florence and Leonard had been on a two- week horse pack-trip into the Jim Bridger Wilderness Area in Wyoming but were back and she was taking care of the children. (I don’t know how she did all this!) On the night of the 31st I’d taken the three children and numerous diapers, clothes, a playpen, etc. to Florence and Leonard’s in preparation for our leaving the next day. Florence was at the Art Center but Leonard was there.

It was cloudy and showering when we started up the trail. The trail was very brushy and we began to get wet. Every leaf seemed to be waiting to dump its load of water on us. My new pack was very comfortable—I carried 30 pounds and Bob 40. “When we were getting close to the lake we passed through a little pitcher plant bog, which included a bear wallow. Here we met a couple on their way out. As we reached the lake we met another couple who said they’d caught some fish the night before. We went around the east side of the lake, scrambling over rocks and through brush. I had troubles with my pack, which flopped around a bit. Kept pushing down on my head when I crawled, my usual graceful method of rock climbing. “

We finally found a nice campsite—good view across the lake and out to mountains beyond. “The lake itself is one of the prettiest we’ve been to—granite cliffs, studded with brush and fir, very deep. We were cold, wet, and miserable. The wind was blowing hard; we were soaked to the waist. Bob heated up water on his stove and we had hot tea and candy before setting up camp. We were using Florence and Leonard’s tent. “

I built a fire in the rocks and heated up water on the iron top that was there. We cooked dinner on Bob’s stove. Went to bed early and wakened often during the night. Apparently there wasn’t a rainfly because I wrote that Bob had put plastic over the tent top and it rustled in the wind all night.

“In the morning Bob was still tired and cold so he slept in. After much struggle with wet, smoky wood I got breakfast. After I’d cleaned up the dishes I left Bob a note and went up the hill behind here. There are a series of small benches rising up to the base of the final cliff. I had a marvelous time exploring—several tiny creeks ran through there and there were numerous little ponds in the granite and mossy miniature cliffs with tiny waterfalls trickling over them. The top pond was the largest and I disturbed some frogs there. I got back at lunchtime. We talked about how good it would be to get the children in here. Bob saying the thing to do would be to get them into one lake and just stay.” (which we did a number of years later although not this lake.)

We had moved into town that Sunday. Washing machine, ducks, cat, children. I’d also prepared and canned five quarts of applesauce that day and picked most of the peaches. Rebecca had started school Monday. I took her the first day and she rode the bus home. Tuesday she caught the bus as usual. She didn’t want to go to Warm Mountain School much so we decided to wait awhile but Jeffrey was very anxious to go. She was much more secure and happy with routine.

“It’s so nice sitting here on the rocks in the sun—and so cold when a cloud goes over! A chipmunk lives nearby and explores the camp frequently. It nibbled at the bar of soap last night.”

Later—“It’s after dinner now. The sun is still tipping the backsides of the spikey ridges around the lake. And it still covers the top of the bare-topped mountain off in the distance. An occasional puffy white cloud hazes its way across above us. We’re sitting by the fire having consumed an enormous meal of bullion, beef stroganoff and chocolate pudding and tea.”

That night the wind blew very hard until about midnight, apparently the last vestiges of the storm. About 11:30 I had to get up so Bob suggested that I take the plastic covering off the tent. It was flapping and making a terrible racket. There was a bright moon and not a cloud in the sky. In the morning when I got up there was frost on the woodpile and on shrubs around camp. By 8:30 our camp was in sunlight and I had taken a quick dip to wake up. Our campsite was at the foot of a big glacial- polished slide.

After breakfast I fixed lunch and we made a rather late start for the area where I hiked yesterday. We planned to go to Little Bear Lake. When we topped the ridge, abut an hour out of camp, we could see Mt. Shasta to the east and right below us, Little Bear Lake. It was a beautiful little lake, much deeper and larger than we’d expected. Very dark green in the deepest parts. It took about ½ hour scramble to get down to it. There were several good campsites in the trees near the outlet and one on a point above the outlet. The lower end of the lake was pretty well crisscrossed with fallen logs. It sat in a granite basin similar to that of Big Bear Lake but there was more vegetation and there was even a tiny patch of snow on the north-facing side. The campsites were cleaner than most and we were very impressed with the place. On way out we followed down the outlet where there was another lake/pond size but deep with shallow areas where a child could play. We talked all the way back to camp about trying to get Rebecca and Jeffrey up there next summer. We contoured around the granite glacial-polished slopes on our way out, coming into Big Bear Lake at the lower end. Said hello to our neighbors and then went on around back to camp. The sun was gone from our camp by 4:15 and from our swimming area by 4:00 so we jumped in as soon as we got there. Bob swam clear around the point to camp but I just went a short distance—am not that strong a swimmer. Much warmer that day. Didn’t need jackets until evening.

We saw and heard Clarke’s Nutcrackers over at Little Bear Lake. That chipmunk was investigating us again. It must have had a good time exploring the camp while we were gone.

Our tent faced the lake and the campfire was between the tent and the lake. Small mountain hemlocks were scattered among the rocks, fox-tail pine and an occasional fir. Most of our firewood was small, dead branches which had fallen from the hemlocks, bark from big downed pieces of fir or hemlock in the talus piles, etc. Some of it was pink from a borate drop that landed in the rocks. Around an inlet from us was an area about 50-feet square where a fire had burned. Four, old paper sleeping bags lay nearby, left by smokejumpers.

It took us 4 hours to hike out including a lunch break. After we got back to Weaverville Saturday I cleaned up, went to the grocery store, and then picked up the children. My descriptions were so detailed and there was a sketch or two so I think we must not have had a camera along.

Sunday the roofers came—they’d brought the asphalt shingles the night before. They left mid-afternoon because of the heat and came back Monday to finish the job. We went out to the ranch with Janet and Mike. The sunflowers were in bloom. Picked a few tomatoes, peas, green beans and blackberries. Janet and Mike picked a few boxes of apples and a bucket full for us as well as a sack full I wanted to give to the Ohdes.

That morning Lewiston school had called to see whether I could substitute for a week for Mr. Giovenetti, who taught 4th and 5th grades, as he had an emergency appendectomy. Linda Lindsey would take care of Jeff and Clarke, and Rebecca would go to Hooper’s after school.

We had the two ducks out on the back lawn in separate cages to keep them from pecking each other and were considering taking them to Janet and Mike’s.

Bob was running around like crazy that afternoon picking up the papers the shingles had been packed in, dumping stacked up branches, hauling garbage and wanting to throw away all the children’s outside toys! “If a new roof does that imagine what a newly painted house will do!”

“I wish he’d slow down some. It worries me when he’s hitting such a hard pace as he has most of this last year. Thank goodness he had the camping trip, wearing though it was. It’s also hard on family relationships when he’s gone so much and when home either sleeping all day or studying.”

Summer Comes to a Close

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July 17, 1971—Jeff got his cast off.

Dinner on Gilda and Sandy Sander’s houseboat at the lake with Bob’s boss, Don Lance, the Sanders, Bob Van Duyn and Elwin Bagley, Roy Blair and Jim Barrett. Most of the men spent the evening talking business but Jim Bob Van Duyn, Gilda and I each took a turn at water skiing.

A few days later we took Rebecca’s friend Nancy with us out to the ranch. About half an hour after I went to bed Nancy woke up and the rest of the night was difficult because she was afraid of the dark. It was very dark out there once the generator got turned off. No night lights, no street lights, just very dark. Not good if you were a nightlight child. Left a flashlight on but its batteries ran down. Finally put her in bed with me. The next day we took Nancy home, then went to Candy and Jim Fields’ house to visit. Ate lunch there and the children all played in the creek.

After dinner that night Rebecca, Jeff and Bob went to Hooper’s to get the ducks; two week old Muskovies. Out at the ranch that weekend I dug a little pond for them under the apple trees. We kept them in the cat cage at night. I started a fence but needed more wire.

Bob had someone come out with Ken Arbo’s backhoe –he dug one culvert, then got stuck up near the bathtub settling-tank. Ken Arbo came out Monday night to get his backhoe but also dug the needed culvert with ease.

Jeff went to Merry Phillips birthday party. While he attended the party Rebecca, Clarke and I went to Varney’s for lunch. It was very crowded and we sat with Ola Peterson, which was a treat. The next day I had to take Clarke to get a DPT shot because Tigger had scratched a fraction of an inch from his eye the day before.

Then we headed for Big Bar and got caught in a tremendous thunderstorm. A cloudburst from about Helena on. Jeffrey and Clarke slept through it until we got to the house but Rebecca awoke at our road so was in on the strikes hitting all around us. We saw a couple of good ones in the Prairie Creek drainage near the switchback. I was a little nervous about getting out to unlock the gate. Of course I got soaked hauling groceries and children from the car to the house when we got home. It was very exciting though with huge raindrops and hail pounding down. “Finally it cleared off leaving the air damp and clear, steam rising from everywhere. We’ll have to watch for smokes for the next week or so.”

Bob had to go to Mt. Meadow Ranch. “They now have a phone from the Siskiyou side but want to have a mobile phone provided for backup. They had a mobile phone for a couple of years but this year one didn’t work and Bob doesn’t think it will now. He said it never should have since it has to go over Thompson Peak.”

I got a long letter from Mary Jo Omstead about Rebecca’s year of kindergarten. Some of which I agree with and some I don’t. She’s so concerned about her social shyness and I figure she’ll eventually work it out and am not too worried. Bob and I had problems what way too and we’ve survived. She used to get stomachaches as a tiny baby when I took her around a lot of people so I think she’s doing pretty well. I never had friends visit my home as she does or played with other girls at all except at school. We lived away from town and also our parents seldom approved of the other kids. Actually I didn’t have any real girlfriends till college. Those I got along with in high school, except for one or two, were just acquaintances. We had little in common. Rebecca is getting more experiences in dealing with people at an earlier age, which I think will save her a lot of agony later. She has learned to enjoy her own company, which I think is important and few learn to do this. “

Herb Upham came out to help Bob work on culverts. I went into Big Bar with the children to get some extra food. Bob seemed to enjoy working with Herb. We were paying him $3 an hour.

Bob decided to not do the septic tank or generator shed that summer. He didn’t have the time or the money.

In early August my mother had a stroke (at age 62) and my notes are filled with communications with my brothers and my dad. I was upset and wishing there was something I could do to help, kind of hard with small children. My oldest brother was living in Seattle (as was my younger brother) and the closest to Nehalem, Oregon. He was also preparing to go back east for a job interview. He was always pretty good about helping out when help was needed though. Our parents retired a long way from all of us because they didn’t want to be a burden. After numerous phone calls, arguments with doctors, etc. and a phone call to a family friend who was a doctor in the Bay Area they had her flown to Seattle. The ambulance plane landed on the dirt runway at Nehalem to pick her up. In Seattle her broken hip was fixed and rehab begun. My father began to spend time staying at my eldest brother’s house and then time in Nehalem to finish up some work he had started on the outside of the house that had to be completed.

That day I wrote “So far today I’ve swept the upstairs, scrubbed out the shower and washed the outside and inside of the two upstairs windows. Did two batches of laundry and took the children down to Little French Creek for an hour. We ate lunch there and they played in the creek. I spent most of my time fishing little rocks out of Clarke’s mouth and giving him big ones to chew on. Very nice down there—cold water, enough shade, water striders, frogs, minnows. Clarke took two steps yesterday. “

There were no more entries until August 29th. Once again I was trying to catch up on the missed days. One important item was that Clarke hadhad his first birthday. He started walking on the 25th, going a few steps and then falling over but was really anxious to go—and so proud of himself. He was also starting to climb everything he could and was quite strong.

We and John and Mary Ann Field were looking into sending children to an alternative school that would be located at Val Harger’s ranch. It was currently being used as a summer ranch for children. An agreement was signed to use it for the first year for free and we incorporated as Warm Mountain School. Mike Looney and Janet Brown would be the teachers and it would start out at two mornings a week. The school would be in the bunkhouse, which needed to be winterized.

Filsen Glanz, a friend of Bob’s, and his wife Kate and their 3-year old son came to stay one night, camping on the lawn at the ranch. He was teaching in New Hampshire.

Rebecca passed into Advanced Beginners on swimming lessons with her 2-days a week lessons. She made a lot of progress over the summer and the little pool at the ranch helped a lot.

In the middle of August we drove to Berkeley, taking Jeff and Rebecca but leaving Clarke in Linda Lindsey’s care, to attend Marily Grey and Eric Wood’s wedding. The reception was held in Tilden Park in a eucalyptus grove. The musicians came to the grove too, which was a nice touch. There was an oboe, a flute and a cello. After the reception we went on the merry-go-round, a large, old fashioned one with music provided from a roll, like a player piano—pipes and drums were activated on the back of a panel. (I hadn’t been on one since I was living at Castle Crags and we went on one at a carnival in Dunsmuir). Then we rode on a little tram in another area of the park. The children loved it. Jeffrey felt very big handing the attendant his ticket.

The Saturday before the wedding we stopped at the Ski Hut and bought a backpack for me. That night we took the children to see The Yellow Submarine, which they enjoyed at one level and we at another. Sunday we visited the Hall of Science—the children kept busy for about 1 ½ hours with all the gadgets. We then went to take one more ride on the merry-go-round (it ended up being four more). After lunch we headed for home.

By the end of August I’d canned 16 quarts of applesauce and picked a lot of blackberries, many near Price Creek and some from the bushes across from the house. I made two pies and over three quarts of jam. Our peach tree was loaded and I picked as many as I could because school was starting soon and we had to move back into town. I spent a lot of time sawing or gathering wood for the kitchen stove during the summer and had taken over completely on the lawn mowing.